BPAS: Charity or Industry?

A truly excellent analysis today by Caroline Farrow on Clare Murphy, Director of Press and Publicity at BPAS.

Clare Murphy has written an article in today’s Independent claiming that those who are using the language of business and commerce for abortion clinics are insulting women who choose to have an abortion.

For tax reasons BPAS is a charity.  We know what they do for unborn babies. Whether BPAS 'help' women is objectively much contested. Not that it would justify it, but I wonder just how many letters the BPAS receive from women saying, "Thanks so much for helping me. When I needed a shoulder you were there."

Talking of which, I popped up just now to see 40 Days for Life in Brighton. I was told by one of the volunteers there that despite what The Argus may have reported, 40 Days for Life are helping one woman who broke down in tears when she arrived at the abortion clinic. She is homeless and is now going through detox in the hope of having her baby. She is now living with one of the volunteers of 40 Days for Life and receiving true charity and support. She is awaiting placement by the Council, which I expect will mean some form of temporary accommodation. We know what temporary accommodation is like in Brighton. The woman is a rape victim who felt, on arriving at the clinic, that she didn't have a 'choice'.  Having asked BPAS to see a scan and having received counselling from 40 Days for Life, she wants to try and keep her baby. I say 'try' because as we know it is likely that because of her addictions the vultures at social services will be hovering over her when she gives birth. Keep her in your prayers.  I'm thinking very much of going up to Bedford Square this evening to pray and to cover the vigil tonight with Bishop Alan Hopes.

Comments

blondpidge said…
Thanks Laurence. I am planning to pop along later. The rest of Clare Murphy's article also bears further analysis.

Keeping this lady in prayer. Social workers can be very coercive as you know.
Francis said…
The woman is a rape victim who felt, on arriving at the clinic, that she didn't have a 'choice'.

Exactly, yet how ironic. It is pro-lifers (at their best, anyway) who are most genuinely "pro-choice" - giving the information, advice, counselling and long-term support to enable women to have a real choice. Instead of being led to believe that getting rid of "it" will solve all their problems, they can actually choose life instead of death. (And then where will BPAS get all their money from?)