Is this the most blasphemous song ever recorded?



I think it is about the euphoric effect of certain drugs. The link between Christ's risen and glorious state and euphoric highs is clever, but just because it is clever does not stop this from being perhaps one of the most blasphemous songs ever recorded. Or am I being over the top? Just on the surface level, the search for bliss, blessedness, paradise, Heaven, union with God, immortality are surely elements of drug use. St Augustine described the man looking for love in all the wrong places, as is our habit, as a man searching for God, that somehow, even notorious sins are an expression of that search for the Lord, for eternal union with the Blessed Trinity. Still, with all that said, there is something outrageously sacrilegious about a man singing "I am the Resurrection and the Life", even more so when what he really means is that he is just high on various chemical drugs.

Comments

James said…
This is also a contender...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRdtPaVaqYY
Ann-Marie said…
See your point but as most people haven't a clue about quotes like "I am the Resurrection and the Life" perhaps we just better let it pass.
I gave up on arguing when a a kid was asked if he knew anything about Genesis and he said it was a band.

What is the painting and an engraving I think? Looks like Peter and John rushing to the tomb? The engraving looks like the two Marys listening to the angel? Nice one.
Cheers Laurence. Happy Easter.
aaron said…
Aside from the question of art and the moral life... is it not scandalous to promote something which is blasphemous?

Is it indeed sinful to listen to something blasphemous?

There's a song that I like by Lady Gaga called "Judas" which seems to attribute to Judas the adoration shown to Jesus by Mary (the annointing); I am rather at pains to know whether I should delete from the iTunes.

May have to contact a Priest on this one.
A-M said…
There is NOTHING, ever, ever, never could be, in the entire world as horribly offensive and blasphemous as the Life of Brian song from a cross!

I am so upset even thinking about it that I must go and watch the snooker.
Janet Baker said…
Well, I'm pressed to find any life form more hurtful, if that's part of blasphemy, than the cool, calm, happy indifferentist.

People are looking for happiness. Yeah, in all the wrong places, but haven't we faithful helped in the misdirection by failing to persist to raise the cry for the restoration?

I have been thinking on this for many weeks now, trying to write a post that expresses that our human desire for happiness on earth is natural, normal, God-given, and that it never can be fulfilled without a Catholic state, while we, the Church, have silenced that legitimate call. We were meant to live in such a state, secularism tortures us in all ways large and small, but we have no legitimate way to satisfy even our longing for it. I think our overwhelming rush toward socialism in the last century, and especially what is called liberation theology, is what happens when the desire for a truly just, religious state is crushed.

Of course we think this dream is dead, has been dead for hundreds and hundreds of years (five hundred, right, lads?). But no! Islam has resurrected it with even their middle classes' mission to institute authetic islamic states--that's what the Gallup poll (of a billion muslims!)found two years ago. But we're not listening. We're spouting back at them the tired old Vatican II secular state/religious freedom/ecumenism nonsense--I mean even the Taliban Catholics, as you call us. (I have a post on the Middle Eastern Synod of last August, to see what the bishops are saying to Pakistan, Iran, and all, and the 'traditional sites' in the area--don't want to name names, love them--are posting this nonsense right along with the rest.)

I can mourn this kind of blasphemy, but when will we give the young some hope? This 'private religion' stuff will always so *not* satisfy, and people will go do this kind of thing in their ignorance.

Of course that would mean enormous social change, especially now that Catholics have been so reduced in number. But we're undergoing such enormous social change now that it would be more like going with the flow to raise new Catholic parties, new Catholic civic demands. (You must surely know there's a Catholic economic solution to our present woes!)

I'm writing a science fiction novel where the first Catholic state since Vatican II is raised on an asteroid, in flight from Halliburton's first space colony. I'm calling it Run. But my comments here mean we ought to start asking for the real thing. Then kids could have unblasphemous songs about making the resurrection mean something personal to them.